The Truth Behind the 9/11 Attacks and Their Aftermath

The Truth Behind the 9/11 Attacks and Their Aftermath

The mastermind behind the 911 attacks, Khalid Sheik Mohammed (KSM), shared his innermost secrets with James E Mitchell. Mitchell, a retired Air Force psychologist, recently released his new book, “Enhanced Interrogation: Inside the Minds and Motives of the Islamic Terrorists Trying To Destroy America” where he details his conversations with KSM. Mitchell has been called a war criminal and torturer. He has been the subject of an ethics complaint, and two congressional committees and a CIA internal watchdog have both criticized his methods. He will tell you that in spite of rumors that he applied to be the torturer in chief with some sort of crazy desire to turn the screws on people, “I’m just a guy who got asked to do something for his country by people at the highest level of government, and I did the best that I could.” And his best was quite successful. Personally, the claims of torture are much ado about nothing. Waterboarding was the “torture” to which KSM and two others were subjected. Waterboarding has been used by fraternities in hazing, and our military personnel, who might be subject to capture are waterboarded as part of their training. You may feel as if you are drowning, but you are not, cannot, and will not. Dealing with people who cut off heads and worse, it does not seem extreme in the least. Mitchell is a true American Patriot. Once the terrorist’s resistance was broken, they opened up and became very cooperative, even detailing their training, recruiting, and ideology.  KSM even joked that Mitchell had become a “Known associate” of KSM and had graduated his...
Obamacare “Restrains” Doctors from Keeping Nursing Home Residents Safe

Obamacare “Restrains” Doctors from Keeping Nursing Home Residents Safe

In 2002, my father passed away from complications of Parkinson’s Disease and a staph infection. He spent the last 14 months of his life in two different nursing homes. He was too incapacitated physically for my mom to care for him, or for home health care.  My dad tended to wander at night and would actually leave the house. The very tough decision was made for him to enter a nursing home. Within the first two months, he tried to escape twice. Then, he fell and broke his hip while trying to get out of a wheelchair. It had a clipped-on tray on the front to prevent him from falling out. But my dad, always the engineer, disconnected the tray easily when no one was looking, and then fell when he stood up. After his hip replacement, we moved him to another facility where my mom could live in a senior apartment on the campus and be near him. At that nursing facility, he had a Velcro belt restraint which kept him from trying to get out of his wheelchair and hurting himself. He actually liked it and felt safe. All was smooth until his passing. Now, 14 years later, my mother is in a nursing home with dementia. She is unable to transfer on her own from a sitting position to standing to lying down.  She is much more unstable than my father was.  My mom lashes out at the staff and doesn’t cooperate well with doctors, dentists, and at meal times.  My brothers and I go there and make sure she eats well and is taken care of. We never let them know...
This Day in History – December 2

This Day in History – December 2

December 2 1760 – 5th US Attorney General, John Breckinridge, is born 1777 – According to legend, Philadelphia nurse Lydia Darragh saves the lives of General George Washington and his Continental Army when she overhears the British planning a surprise attack on Washington’s army for the following day. Darragh eavesdropped while they made plans in the room they commandeered in the Darragh’s home, and then she took notes and sewed them into her coat before handing them to American troops stationed outside the city 1793 – In an attempt to escape his debtors, poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge enlists in the Light Dragoons, an English cavalry unit 1804 – Napoleon Bonaparte is crowned Emperor of France in Notre Dame Cathedral by Pope Pius VII 1805 – Napoleon Bonaparte defeats a Russian and Austrian army at Austerlitz 1814 – French politician and author Marquis de Sade dies 1823 – President James Monroe proclaims the principles known as the Monroe Doctrine, “that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintained, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by European powers” 1825 – Pedro II, “the Magnanimous,” the last ruler of the Empire of Brazil, is born 1837 – British physician believed to be the prototype of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Joseph Bell, is born 1845 – President James Polk reasserts the Monroe Doctrine of 1823 and calls for an aggressive American expansion in the West during his first annual address to Congress 1859 – French painter and founder and leader of the Pointillism style, Georges Seurat is...