This Day in History – May 31

This Day in History – May 31

MAY 31 1433 – Sigismund is crowned emperor of Rome 1469 – Manuel I, King of Portugal, is born 1678 – The Godiva procession, commemorating Lady Godiva’s legendary ride while naked, becomes part of the Coventry Fair 1775 – The Mecklenburg County Committee in North Carolina, rejecting the power of the British in North Carolina 1809 – Austrian composer, Joseph Haydn, dies 1819 – Poet Walt Whitman is born 1837 – English actor and dancer, Joseph Grimaldi, dies 1859 – The famous clock tower Big Ben, located in St. Stephen’s Tower in London, rings for the first time 1862 – At the Battle of Fair Oaks, Union General George B. McClellan defeats Confederates outside of Richmond 1879 – New York’s Madison Square Garden opens its doors for the first time 1887 – Tombstone doctor, George Goodfellow, rushes south to investigate an earthquake in Mexico. Goodfellow is known as one of the most scientifically advanced doctors in the West and considered to be an expert on the treatment of gunshot wounds RELATED: THIS-DAY-IN-HISTORY–JUNE-3 1889 – Johnstown, Pennsylvania is destroyed by massive flood that killed over 2,200 people when the South Fork Dam collapsed 1894 – American comedian, Fred Allen, aka John Florence Sullivan, is born 1898 – American religious leader, Norman Vincent Peale, is born 1900 – US troops arrive in Peking to help put down the Boxer Rebellion 1902 – The Boer War ends with the Treaty of Vereeniging RELATED: THIS-DAY-IN-HISTORY–JUNE-2 1909 – The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) holds its first conference 1913 – The 17th amendment to the US Constitution, providing for direct election...
Indy 500 outrage: Sports reporter out of a job after controversial tweet

Indy 500 outrage: Sports reporter out of a job after controversial tweet

By FOX 59 Indianapolis May 28, 2017: Takuma Sato, center, of Japan, celebrates after winning the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis.  (AP)   A longtime sportswriter no longer works at the Denver Post after being criticized about a controversial tweet about the winner of Sunday’s Indianapolis 500. “Nothing specifically personal, but I am very uncomfortable with a Japanese driver winning the Indianapolis 500 during Memorial Day weekend,” tweeted Terry Frei after Takuma Sato became the first Japanese driver to win the prestigious race. So @TFrei deleted this tweet. But I look forward to his future racing coverage pic.twitter.com/ZSjtBszTHs — Alan Cavanna (@CopaCavanna) May 28, 2017 Frei later took the tweet down and apologized, but not before a screenshot was taken and spread across the internet. I apologize. — Terry Frei (@TFrei) May 29, 2017 The newspaper tweeted its own apology Sunday. “The Denver post apologizes for a tweet sent by one of our reporters, Terry Frei, that does not reflect the standards and values of our organization,” read the statement. “We are treating this as a personnel issue and have no further comment at this time.” On Monday morning, the Post said Frei no longer works for the newspaper. It’s unclear if he was fired or resigned. “We apologize for the disrespectful and unacceptable tweet that was sent by one of our reporters. Terry Frei is no longer an employee of The Denver Post. It’s our policy not to comment further on personnel issues.” said publisher Mac Tully and editor Lee Ann Colacioppo in a statement on the Post’s website. “The tweet doesn’t represent what we believe nor...
Hamerton Zoo Park: Zookeeper killed by tiger in enclosure in UK

Hamerton Zoo Park: Zookeeper killed by tiger in enclosure in UK

A female zookeeper has been killed by a tiger after it entered the enclosure she was in.  (SkyNews) A tiger killed a female zookeeper after the animal entered an enclosure she was in at a zoo in England, police said. Police arrived at Hamerton Zoo Park, located about 80 miles north of London, at 11:15 a.m. after they received reports of a “serious incident.” Air ambulance were at the zoo about 20 minutes later, but the zookeeper died at the scene after the attack. Visitors were evacuated shortly after the incident. “At no time did the animal escape from the enclosure,” Combridgeshire Constabulary wrote on Facebook, adding that they believe there was no foul play. Eyewitness Jeff Knott, from Cambridgeshire, told Sky News that staff had been “a real credit” to the zoo during the evacuation. “Staff were very calm and professional. All visitors around us were leaving in a very calm manner — no running, shouting or anything similar,” Knott told Sky News. Hamerton Zoo Park said in a statement that it appeared to be a “freak accident” and a full investigation will be conducted. “All our thoughts and sympathies are with our colleagues friends and families at this dreadful time. The park will be closed from tomorrow 30th May, and we will give more information as soon as we can,” the statement read. The zoo did not provide any further details on the tiger. Read more from...
Manuel Noriega, former Panama dictator, dead at 83

Manuel Noriega, former Panama dictator, dead at 83

Associated Press FILE 2011: Manuel Noriega, then 77, poses for a photograph in this picture received by Reuters in Panama City   Former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega has died, a source close to his family said. He was 83. The source was not authorized to be quoted by name. There was no immediate information on the cause of death, which occurred late Monday. Panamanian President Juan Carlos Varela wrote in his Twitter account that “the death of Manuel A. Noriega closes a chapter in our history.” The onetime U.S. ally was ousted as Panama’s dictator by an American invasion in 1989. Noriega later served a 17-year drug sentence in the United States. He spent the first two decades after his ouster in U.S. and French jails and the final years of his life in a Panamanian prison for murder of political opponents during his 1983-89 regime. Noriega accused Washington of a “conspiracy” to keep him behind bars and tied his legal troubles to his refusal to cooperate with a U.S. plan aimed at toppling Nicaragua’s leftist Sandinista government in the 1980s. In recent years, Noriega had suffered various ailments, including high blood pressure and bronchitis. In 2016, doctors detected the rapid growth of a benign brain tumor that had first been spotted four years earlier. In January of this year, a court granted him house arrest to prepare for surgery on the tumor. Noriega is survived by his wife, Felicidad, and daughters Lorena, Thays and...
Little sense to be made of Penguins’ Game 1 win over Predators in Stanley Cup Final

Little sense to be made of Penguins’ Game 1 win over Predators in Stanley Cup Final

ALEX PREWITT PITTSBURGH — Welcome, friend. Fancy a beer? Perhaps a catfish po’boy, provided your appetite didn’t dissolve after seeing all those piscine guts strewn across the ice? In any case, find a seat. Settle down. Digesting this funhouse mirror of a match might take some time. Let us begin at the end of Game 1 in this 2017 Stanley Cup Final, with the cherubic rookie raising both arms and PPG Paints Arena rattling back to life. Exactly 37 minutes had elapsed with Pittsburgh’s shot counter stuck on eight, and there must have been moments when even the defending champions felt like the drought would stretch into Tuesday morning. Then came Jake Guentzel, scoreless in his past eight, sprung into space and hoping to heave something—anything—onto Nashville netminder Pekka Rinne. Inside the left face-off circle, Guentzel reared back and fired. The puck screamed into the top corner, the entire building followed suit, and… Well, hold up. Let’s rewind, back to that eighth on-goal attempt, less an actual shot than Penguins center Nick Bonino arriving at the arcade with a sleeve of quarters and pulling the plunger on the pinball machine. “It’s funny,” Bonino said later, after his empty-net heave had clinched a 5-3 win and a 1-0 series lead, “you try to get the perfect shot off a lot. Then you just throw it at the net with one hand and it goes in…We’ll take ’em how we can get ’em, for sure.” Certainly Bonino banking the puck off Predators defenseman Mattias Ekholm’s knee—and then past Rinne—with 17 seconds left in the first period applies. So does Evgeni Malkin...