Same-Sex Marriage Decision to Be Revisited

Same-Sex Marriage Decision to Be Revisited

Photo Wikimedia Commons On June 26th, Fox News reported that the U.S. Supreme Court had announced that day, “It will hear the case of a suburban Denver baker who refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple on faith-based grounds.” [Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission] It will in reality be deciding if discrimination laws trump the First Amendment. Coincidentally, it was two years ago, to the day, since the SCOTUS ruled 5–4 in Obergefell v. Hodges that state laws forbidding marriage of people of the same sex are unconstitutional. The majority redefined the meaning of marriage—based upon nonexistent provisions in the Constitution. By so doing, they had redefined the whole of human tradition and biology as well. Who knew courts had that kind of power? Clearly, such a decision belongs in the states, not in the hands of five unelected people. With one state legislature after the other allowing gay marriage anyway, there was no need for the High Court to usurp their rights. Ironically, the Congress could have preserved the states’ right to make that decision by simply passing a bill declaring that the Supreme Court did not have jurisdiction over the definition of marriage. Yes, a Congress with integrity would have seen this coming and would have used its the power to prevent it. “What?” you ask: “How dare you say the power of the Supreme Court is not Supreme! Daniel Horowitz, writing in Conservative Review, said: “Article III, Section 2, Clause 2 of the Constitution explicitly grants Congress the authority to regulate and limit the appellate jurisdiction of the Supreme Court:...