Mr. President: Keep Your Promise to Black Americans on DACA

Mr. President: Keep Your Promise to Black Americans on DACA

A Wall St. Journal article on August 25th discusses the people who were brought to the US by their illegal alien parents, called by some “dreamers,” though they are just as illegal as their parents. But in June of 2012 Obama, in effect, rewrote the Immigration and Naturalization Act, giving them legal status under DACA, which allows them to stay here and also work. According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, 1,267,834 applications had been accepted, through June 30, 2016. During his campaign, Mr. Trump repeatedly promised to end DACA on day one of his term. As the WSJ points out, candidate Trump called DACA “an ‘unconstitutional executive amnesty,’ but, after [he] took office, he softened his stance and has allowed the program to continue, with his administration approving applications and renewals.” “‘DACA is a very, very difficult subject for me,’” he said in a news conference in February [and other times]. ‘It’s one of the most difficult subjects I have because you have these incredible kids.’” The late Jerry Lewis, who spearheaded fundraising for research into Multiple Dystrophy, called his beneficiaries “my kids,” but they really were kids. Trump’s kids, under DACA rules could be up to 36 years old today: To be eligible for DACA, applicants must have been “under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012,” meaning they could be 36 today. So, Mr. Trump’s calling them “incredible kids” is based on sentimental fantasy, not fact. Now, eleven states have given the DOJ until September 5th to start enforcing existing law against beneficiaries of Obama’s illegal amnesty, or they will add DACA to their...
The Grim Outlook for the War on Terror, with Bannon and Gorka Gone

The Grim Outlook for the War on Terror, with Bannon and Gorka Gone

What does the Bannon firing by the White House mean to those who voted for Trump, hoping to see his campaign positions actually carried out? As the president’s Chief Strategist, Bannon was unquestionably the man who taught the president how to at least act like a conservative. It remains to be seen if President Trump will retain and implement what he’s learned. Trump announced his most critically important campaign promise in his inaugural speech: to “unite the civilized world against radical Islamic terrorism, which we will eradicate from the face of the Earth.” This threat is of prime importance, not only for the threat of terrorism itself, but because Islam holds the potential to ultimately destroy America through the Hijra, Mohammed’s command to all Muslims to conquer the world through migration. As Ann Corcoran pointed out in her monograph on the Hijra: According to Islam’s doctrines and its quietly acknowledged organizational strategies, the goal of migration today is not peaceful assimilation to the political system and mores of the host country. Instead, the goal is jihad by non-violent means—known as civilization jihad or Islamization. The biggest sources of Muslim migration to the United States include the Refugee Resettlement/Asylum Program, as well as many other channels for legal and illegal immigration. Though Mr. Trump has vowed to reform the programs Ms. Corcoran cited, it’s not at all certain the president sees the larger threat. And no one in his circle is likely to tell him, now. As for his promise to eradicate radical Islamic terrorism, he’s gone in the opposite direction by replacing National Security Advisor Flynn—who viewed Islam as...
Was Charlottesville a False Flag?

Was Charlottesville a False Flag?

Was the unrest in Charlottesville, Virginia on Saturday, August 12th a riot by white supremacists, as the Media has labeled it, or something even more sinister? Was it a false-flag attack orchestrated by the Left and Democrats to permanently damage the president and compel Americans to view everything through the lens of racism? How the Media purposefully misreported the incident In the wake of the violence in Charlottesville, the ever-Trump-unfriendly media has focused on the president’s failure to immediately call out those protesting the Robert E. Lee statue’s removal, many—but not all—of whom were white nationalists and neo-Nazis. On the day of the incident, he said, “‘We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides,’ quoted the Los Angeles Times, “then, looking into the camera, he repeated, ‘On many sides.’” After a storm of criticism for not calling out the Klan, et al., the next day the White House issued a statement saying “of course” the president had included in his condemnation “white supremacists, KKK, neo-Nazi and all extremist groups,” and that he “called for national unity and bringing all Americans together.” But the press continued to rip him for, as the LA Times put it, “not denouncing the far-right groups that initiated the violence, and the man who drove into a crowd of counter-protesters that left Heather Heyer dead.” After again blasting “the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and other hate groups,” on Monday, and the Media’s continued harsh criticism, Trump told the press on Tuesday, that he didn’t initially attack those groups because “unlike you,” he waited for the facts to...