Rachel Dolezal Disinvited From Book Festival After Public Backlash

Rachel Dolezal Disinvited From Book Festival After Public Backlash

by Fox News Rachel Dolezal disinvited from Baltimore Book Festival after public backlash   Days after defending its decision to have Dolezal, the white woman who led others to believe she was black, take part in the Baltimore Book Festival, organizers say the former head of the Spokane chapter of the NAACP has been disinvited, Tuesday, May 30, 2017.  (Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.) Organizers for the Baltimore Book Festival announced Tuesday they disinvited Rachel Dolezal, the controversial white woman who represented herself as African American for years, to this year’s event after receiving major public backlash. Related: 5-movies-unveiled-at-cannes-film-festival-that-youll-really-want-to-see Festival organizers released a statement on its Facebook page, citing reaction from attendees and authors as the reason for rescinding Dolezal’s invitation. “A top priority of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts is to listen to our constituents, and after hearing from a cross-section of opinions on having Rachel Dolezal participate in this year’s festival, we had to consider how her appearance may affect both the audience and the other extraordinary authors we have planned for the Baltimore Book Festival,” the statement read. Related: host-faces-blowback-maher-slammed-after-using-racial-slur-during-show Baltimore Book Festival 20 hours ago For 21 years, the Baltimore Book Festival has hosted more than 3,000 writers and has been a venue for the exchange of ideas and information. In the past, we have hosted writers with different views and perspectives, always with the goal of presenting authors that engage the audience with topical and enlightening discourse. A top priority of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts is to listen to our constituents, and after hearing from a...
Jean Fritz, author of ground-breaking historical biographies for children, dies aged 101

Jean Fritz, author of ground-breaking historical biographies for children, dies aged 101

BookBrowse News Jean Fritz, an award-winning writer whose work helped transform historical biographies for children from leaden recitals of battles and dates into warm, human narratives full of quirks and crotchets and satisfyingly strange facts, died on Sunday at her home in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. She was 101. The author of more than four dozen books, Mrs. Fritz was known in particular for her biographies of many of the signal figures of 18th- and 19th-century American history. Source: New York...
JACKIE’S ASSISTANT TELLS ALL

JACKIE’S ASSISTANT TELLS ALL

by Fox News JACKIE KENNEDY’S ASSISTANT KATHY MCKEON DISHES ON THE FORMER FIRST LADY By Stephanie NolascoWhen 19-year-old Kathy McKeon arrived to the United States from her native Ireland in 1964, she was hired to become the personal assistant to former first lady Jackie Kennedy.   Not only would she spend the next 13 years with the notoriously private icon, but she said she developed a lasting friendship that few knew about, until now. JFK’S ONLY GRANDSON MAKES FIRST LIVE TB APPEARANCE McKeon, who chronicled their relationship in her memoir “Jackie’s Girl,” wrote that she helped raise Jackie’s two young children, Caroline and John Jr. RELATED: CHRIS-CORNELL-LEAD-SINGER-OF-SOUNDGARDEN-DIES-AT-52 Courtesy of Kathy McKeon  (Jackie, Caroline, and John Jr. attended Kathy McKeon’s wedding.) “Caroline did talk to me about her father [John F. Kennedy] all the time,” the 72-year-old told Fox News. She said the first thing the young child ever asked McKeon was if she knew her father. RELATED: STUNNED–BLINDSIDED–TIM-ALLEN-BLASTS-ABC–MOVE-TO-CHOP-HIT-SITCOM The personal assistant also said Caroline made sure to think of her father every night while they said their prayers. “When we said our prayers at night, she would always hold her two hands together and kneel on the floor,” McKeon told us. “She would then put down her head and say, ‘Kat, I’m saying a prayer to my dad.’ She always had a little special prayer for her father. I made sure to teach the children about saying their prayers. We would pray every night and they were so happy.” Courtesy of Kathy McKeon  (Caroline Kennedy with friends.) NATALIE PORTMAN PLAYS JACKIE KENNEDY While Jackie never spoke about her late husband to McKeon,...
10 THINGS WE LEARN ABOUT IVANKA TRUMP IN HER NEW BOOK ON WORKING WOMEN

10 THINGS WE LEARN ABOUT IVANKA TRUMP IN HER NEW BOOK ON WORKING WOMEN

by USA Today Books Maria Puente      (Photo: Markus Schreiber, AP)   She’s the daughter of a billionaire family who married into another billionaire family and she’s made millions selling merchandise branded with her name — enough to employ platoons of nannies and assistants. So what could Ivanka Trump teach America’s millions of way-less-privileged working women? Trump’s latest book, Women Who Work: Rewriting the Rules for Success, aims to try. The book, with a new preface she wrote after dad Donald Trump unexpectedly won the presidency in November, is to be published Tuesday (Portfolio, $26), some months later than originally planned. RELATED: FEDS GO AFTER CELEBS ONLINE If you loathe self-help books, don’t bother. If you’re looking for a synthesis of what she’s gleaned from her parents, her own business success and a slew of other advice books, then this is a chatty step-by-step guide to living a happy life and getting ahead in a career. But if you’re curious about Trump, 35, who’s taken an unpaid job as a senior adviser to her father, and how she might influence the Trump administration’s attitudes about women, you might want to lean in. The book’s voice reflects the young woman Americans are getting to know: Poised and measured, articulate, disciplined, organized, and very sure of herself. She sprinkles in shout-outs and quotes from other voices — from the Dalai Lama to Deepak Chopra, Oprah Winfrey to Coco Chanel — but the overall tone is one of a TED pep talk for women tycoons-in-the-making. Cover of ‘Women Who Work’ by Ivanka Trump. (Photo: Diego Uchitel, Portfolio) But what about her? Here are 10 things we learned about Ivanka Trump from her book: Who...
I’m Bullish on Christianity

I’m Bullish on Christianity

When atheists claim there is no evidence for Christianity, I disagree. When liberal theologians assert there are many paths to heaven, I object. When young people say God isn’t relevant in the 21st century, I beg to differ. When analysts predict the decline of the evangelical church, I roll my eyes. Are my positions popular? Maybe not, but they flow out of convictions that have only grown stronger in the midst of the evolving religious landscape in America. Expand / Contract I’ve seen the surveys. I’m aware of the rise of the so-called “nones,” who profess no religious affiliation. And frankly, that doesn’t trouble me very much. Rather than claiming to be Christians, as many have done in years past, now these people are now willing to be more honest. Today it’s socially acceptable — in many places even desirable — to be a skeptic. “Atheist” is no longer considered such a derogatory term. The truth is that America was never as much of a “Christian nation” as some historians wish it were. There was a veneer of faith over the land. “Respectable” people went to church. Now they don’t pretend anymore. That’s okay. I was a scoffer once myself before spiritual skepticism became trendy.  As a law-trained journalist at the Chicago Tribune, I didn’t have any patience for mythology, superstition, or make-believe. “Just give me the facts” was my motto. My wife was agnostic. Then one day, through the influence of a friend and a church, she met Jesus. The first word to come to my mind: divorce. As portrayed in The Case for Christ, the forthcoming movie based on...
Ed Henry: ’42 Faith’ — The rest of the Jackie Robinson story

Ed Henry: ’42 Faith’ — The rest of the Jackie Robinson story

from Fox News Editor’s note: The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 5 of “42 Faith: The Rest of the Jackie Robinson Story” by Fox News’ Ed Henry.  The path was not easier for Jackie Robinson simply because he embraced God. He was far from perfect and had a criminal record from his days in the gang, though it is clear that at least some of the arrests were racially motivated. Jackie and some of his friends were dragged off to jail at gunpoint by a local sheriff because they had gone swimming in the reservoir. Sure, the kids were in the wrong, but it’s hard to believe that a similar swim by white kids would have resulted in them being escorted to jail at all, let alone with weapons pressed to them. After all, Jackie had jumped into the reservoir to protest the ban on African-Americans at the local pool. As he swam, policemen shouted, “Look there, a n*gger swimming in my drinking water. All of that nastiness, plus Robinson’s struggles with the law, have been chronicled before. But precious little time has been spent delving into how he got through all of it and still was able to rise to great heights. Even if his gang activity was relatively minor, it was another fork in the road where he could have veered off course and never made history without some kind of intervention. Jackie’s own daughter, Sharon, would note many years later, “You see these points in his teenage years when he could have gone in either direction.” Mallie Robinson was Jackie’s core. She believed there was destiny from...