‘The worst thing that could possibly happen to a parent’

‘The worst thing that could possibly happen to a parent’

by Washington Post By Tara Bahrampour Lisa Trumbo became a mentor to other bereaved parents after her son, Trevor, died at age 4 of a brain tumor (Allison Rodgers Photography) When Wendy Avery’s 15-year-old son, Nick, died in 2006, less than a year after receiving a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia, there were mornings when she didn’t want to get out of bed. She had quit her job to spend much of the year by her son’s side at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. Now, back home in Canfield, Ohio, she felt lost. “You go home and think, ‘No-one understands,’ ” she recalls. “It’s a whole new world to come into this cancer world when you’ve had healthy kids.” In Avery’s case her sister, who had also lost a child to illness, became a lifeline, calling or emailing daily. But most parents who lose a child enter a realm that is starkly different from any place they ever expected to inhabit, a path upon which few others can truly join them. “They don’t feel understood. They feel lonely,” said Justin Baker, chief of the Division of Quality of Life and Palliative Care at St. Jude. “It can feel like almost complete and total isolation. People who’ve been their friends don’t understand what they’ve been through. Even family and friends who want to help often don’t know what to say.” Related: 10-decluttering-projects Recognizing this, the hospital, which treats children with cancer, runs a program for parents of children whose cases are terminal, matching them with other parents whose children didn’t survive. Related: french-president-starts-trend The program, which began in 2014, currently has 21 parents...
Indiana girl nearly chokes on fidget spinner, firefighter says

Indiana girl nearly chokes on fidget spinner, firefighter says

by Fox Health An Indiana firefighter is warning parents about fidget spinners, a popular fad toy, after his daughter nearly choked on a metal piece that flew off. The child was spinning her fidget spinner while sitting in the backseat of the car when one of the metal bearings broke off and flew into her mouth, according to a Thursday Facebook post on Decatur Township Fire Department’s page. “I did about 5 minutes of back blows and with her coughing it became dislodged and went to her stomach,” the firefighter wrote. The girl was hospitalized and later released. A photo of an x-ray showed the metal piece stuck in the girl’s stomach. “Thankfully this turned out well, but please be aware that it can be a choking hazard,” the department warned. FIDGET SPINNER GETS LODGED IN GIRL’S THROAT Fidget spinners, made of plastic, metal and a ball bearing, have become the must-have toy of the year, hitting store shelves and online retailers starting this spring. The toy was first seen as a popular item for people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism. They have since been banned in many classrooms after teachers claimed they were more of a distraction than a helpful tool. Related: the-worst-thing-that-could-possibly-happen-to-a-parent WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH FIDGET SPINNERS? Related: 10-decluttering-projects Parents also said the toys pose as a potential choking hazard. In May, part of a fidget spinner lodged into a Texas girl’s throat while she was cleaning it with her mouth, a mom wrote in a Facebook post. “She pointed to her throat saying she’d swallowed something, so I attempted Heimlich but there was no resistance,”...
FDA Wants Opioid Painkiller Pulled Off Market

FDA Wants Opioid Painkiller Pulled Off Market

by CNN FDA wants opioid painkiller pulled off market By Jen Christensen     (CNN)The US Food and Drug Administration said Thursday that drugmaker Endo Pharmaceuticals must remove its powerful opioid painkiller Opana ER from the market. The agency says this the first time it has asked that an opioid pain medication be pulled due to “the public health consequences of abuse.” “We are facing an opioid epidemic — a public health crisis — and we must take all necessary steps to reduce the scope of opioid misuse and abuse,” FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said. “We will continue to take regulatory steps when we see situations where an opioid product’s risks outweigh its benefits, not only for its intended patient population but also in regard to its potential for misuse and abuse.” Related: highest-bidder–anonymous-donor-pays-26m-for-lunch-with-buffet Related: clinging-on-to-her-job-britains-may-appoints-new-ministers–bellwether-mayday-will-a-british-trump-be-the-uks-next-prime-minister One short letter’s huge impact on the opioid epidemic If Opana ER sounds familiar, it’s because it was the drug of choice for many addicts at the center of an HIV outbreak in Indiana in 2015. The drug is about twice as powerful as OxyContin, another often abused opioid. Opana ER, oxymorphone hydrochloride, is used to manage pain severe enough to require daily, around-the-clock, long-term opioid treatment for which alternatives aren’t strong enough, according to the manufacturer’s website. The FDA approved it for this use in 2006. “My comment is ‘wow,’ ” said Dr. Andrew Kolodny, co-director of opioid policy research at the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. “This is pretty exciting. This is big news.” Though it is a “good sign” for the fight against opioid abuse, he said, “Opana is not...
PTSD: What it is and how to spot it

PTSD: What it is and how to spot it

By Kaitlyn Schallhorn Published June 07, 2017 Fox News The month of June is designated to bring awareness to post-traumatic stress disorder, a mental health problem that can afflict people following a traumatic event. Anyone who has experienced a traumatic event — an assault, accident or warfare, just to name a few — can experience symptoms of PTSD. Read on to find out more about the disorder and how it is treated. Is PTSD a problem in the U.S.? The National Center for PTSD estimates that 7 to 8 percent of the U.S. population will develop PTSD at some point in their lives. That means about 8 million adults will have PTSD during a given year, the center predicts. More women than men — about 10 percent compared to 4 percent — develop PTSD, according to the National Center for PTSD. “PTSD can  happen to anyone. It is not a sign of weakness,” the website says. “A number of factors can increase the chance that someone will develop PTSD, many of which are not under that person’s control. For example, if you were directly exposed to the trauma or injured, you are more likely to develop PTSD.” What are some symptoms of PTSD? The National Center for PTSD lists four specific symptoms of PTSD but contends that symptoms may not be the exact same for everyone. WILL AN ANTIBIOTIC HELP TREAT PTSD? Those symptoms are: Reliving an event which can result in flashbacks or nightmares. Avoiding situations or conversations that can bring up that traumatic event. Feeling abnormally negative, guilt, shame, disinterest in activities, distrustful of people, afraid or...
Vice Magazine Claims “Straight People Don’t Exist”

Vice Magazine Claims “Straight People Don’t Exist”

Back in 2015, Vice magazine released a controversial story that went under the radar. They suggest that despite the well-established belief about sexual orientation, more specifically, heterosexuals don’t exist. VICE’s feminist channel, geared toward a focus on womens’ issues, published a piece on heterosexuality and sexual fluidity. Diana Tourjee, who reported the story, says “regardless of how women self-report their sexuality, their bodies respond positively to both hetero- and homosexual sex.” The study used by Tourjee claims there are no boundaries in terms of sexuality. “Women’s sexuality is complex and not within the bounds of strict hetero- or homosexuality.” The Director of Developmental Psychology at Cornell University, Ritch C. Savin-Williams, is set on challenging and disproving the long-held cultural beliefs about human sexuality. He told Tourjee his study “is part of a much larger research project he and his fellow researchers are doing to uncover true human sexuality through physiological queues.” “We’re trying to get at the way people really are. Sometimes, it seems people are one way but believe they have to report themselves in another way, and that’s not good,” he added. He goes on to talk about the social influence that supposedly determines “how individuals are perceived and treated.” Savin-Williams says, “we’ve always recognized mostly straight women, that is, women who mostly are straight but if the right woman comes along, well maybe she’ll try it out. We used to think that was only a female phenomenon.” He continues. “We show straight men a picture of a woman masturbating and they respond just like a straight guy, but then you also show them a guy masturbating...
DREAMS AND BRAIN DISEASE: REM SLEEP CELLS LINKED TO DISORDERS

DREAMS AND BRAIN DISEASE: REM SLEEP CELLS LINKED TO DISORDERS

by Fox Health Where do dreams come from?  (iStock) Where do dreams come from? Researchers now say they know: A specific group of cells in the brain stem is responsible for controlling dreaming sleep , also called Rapid Eye Movement (REM) sleep, a new study says. The study also showed that damage to those cells could lead to a sleeping disorder called REM Behavior Disorder (RBD) , which makes a person act out violent dreams . The findings have far broader implications than pinpointing the neurological source of dreams , though, said the study’s principal investigator, John Peever, a professor of cell and systems biology at the University of Toronto. Because previous studies have shown that 80 percent of people with RBD develop incurable brain diseases, the new research could give drug companies a specific group of cells to target for therapies that slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. “For some reason, the cells in the REM sleep area are the first to be sickened, and then the neurodegenerative disease spreads up into the brain and affects the other areas that cause disorders like Parkinson’s disease ,” Peever told Live Science. MORE FROM LIVESCIENCE TOP 11 SPOOKY SLEEP DISORDERS DAYDREAMING AGAIN? 5 FACTS ABOUT THE WANDERING MIND 7 STRANGE FACTS ABOUT INSOMNIA Peever presented his team’s results May 29 at the 2017 Canadian Neuroscience Meeting in Montreal. The findings have not been published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. RELATED: WHAT-I-CUT-TO-LOSE-100-LBS RELATED: WALKING-CORPSE-SYNDROME-THE-WALKING-DEAD-MADE-REAL During a healthy night’s sleep, a person cycles through light sleep, deep sleep and REM sleep several times. During REM sleep, the neurons in the brain stem...