DOG CRASHES LIVE RUSSIAN NEWS BROADCAST

DOG CRASHES LIVE RUSSIAN NEWS BROADCAST

by Fox News One Russian news anchor had a rough day at work. Ilona Linarte was startled on camera after a black Labrador interrupted her live broadcast on Mir24 last week. In a video clip, which started to go viral this week, the canine can be spotted approaching Linarte before barking, causing her to turn around and meet her surprise guest. “I’ve got a dog here,” she exclaimed in Russian. “What is this dog doing in the studio?” The mysterious dog, looking to get some more airtime, jumped up next to Linarte and climbed onto her desk before earning a friendly petting. The station revealed that the dog was on set for another show, but ended up getting loose. Unfortunately for the pooch, he didn’t earn a co-anchor role with Linarte. “I actually prefer cats,” she told the audience. “I’m a cat...
DOG TRAPPED ON 400-FOOT CLIFF IN NEW YORK RESCUED BY COP USING ROPES

DOG TRAPPED ON 400-FOOT CLIFF IN NEW YORK RESCUED BY COP USING ROPES

by Fox News By Travis Fedschun A dog stuck halfway down a 400-foot cliff in an upstate New York gorge Monday had to be rescued by a police officer who had to use a harness and ropes to find the stranded canine.   The New York State Parks office said visitors to Letchworth State Park reported the dog barking in the gorge area of Hogsback Overlook along the Genesee River, located about 30 miles southwest of Rochester. Officials said State Park Police Sgt. Ryan Clancy was lowered down by ropes and hauled back up with the dog named Skippy, who was reported missing in the park two days earlier. The rescue took place in an area where the gorge is “extremely steep and wooded for approximately 200 feet before it transitions to a sheer vertical shale wall several hundred feet to the bottom,” according to the Parks office. Park Police worked with the Livingston County Sheriff’s Office to try to use a drone in an attempt to pinpoint Skippy, but forest canopy was too dense to find the dog. Sgt. Clancy was then lowered down and hauled back up with the canine in tow. RELATED: TEEN-FULFILLS-WISH-TO-RECEIVE-DIPLOMA-DAYS-BEFORE-CANCER-DEATH “This rescue is an important reminder of the selflessness, dedication and teamwork of the men and women charged with keeping New Yorkers and those who visit our great state park system safe,” State Park Police Chief David Page said in a statement. “Whether it’s the people who visit State Parks or their beloved family pets, these civil servants train hard and risk their lives to help others and serve New York.” RELATED: CIGARETTES-CAN-KILL–OR-GET-YOU-KILLED The 6-year-old hunting hound-border...
FROM DEATH ROW TO ADOPTION: SAVING ANIMALS BY CAR, VAN, BUS AND EVEN PLANE

FROM DEATH ROW TO ADOPTION: SAVING ANIMALS BY CAR, VAN, BUS AND EVEN PLANE

by Washington Post Driver Phil Broussard leads a German shepherd onto the Rescue Express bus in San Fernando, Calif. The organization tries to save animals by transporting them to adoption groups in the Pacific Northwest, where euthanasia rates are lower. (Patrick T. Fallon for The Washington Post) SAN FERNANDO, Calif. — May was supposed to be dead by now. The charcoal-and-white pit bull mix had languished for more than two months at a high-kill animal shelter in east Los Angeles County, and though she’d passed one “temperament test” required for adoption, she failed a second. That essentially put her on death row at the facility. But a small rescue group got to May first and reserved her a spot on a school bus that would take her 840 miles north to Eugene, Ore.; there, another rescue had pledged to find her a home. And so on a sunny Saturday morning, she bounded up the steps of the red bus and quickly settled into a large crate near the back. She had plenty of company as the wheels rolled along the highway: 105 other dogs and cats collected from crowded shelters in California and destined for the Pacific Northwest, where euthanasia rates are lower and pets are in greater demand. Their four rows of crates were stacked floor to ceiling. “These little souls have engulfed me,” admitted Phil Broussard, the garrulous trucker driving them up the coast. RELATED: FORGOT-MOTHERS-DAY-HERE-ARE-5-LASTMINUTE-GIFTS-IDEAS His passengers were among the more than 10,000 animals that will be ferried out of the area this year by Rescue Express, one of the dozens of organizations across the nation fueling a dizzying daily...
Fostering an animal is a win-win for parents and pets

Fostering an animal is a win-win for parents and pets

Mary Helen Berg (Photo: Alex DeForest, Arizona Humane Society) Lying side by side on a cozy couch in West Hollywood, Calif., Dirk and Penny make an odd couple. Dirk, a Corgi mix with a hangdog look, is older and four times the size of Penny, a tiny, social Chihuahua-pug hybrid. The two strays met in an animal rescue and fell nose over tail for each other. On a recent morning, as part of an affectionate ritual, Dirk stays stock-still while Penny licks his ear. Their love may be everlasting, but their home is temporary. They’re foster dogs, waiting to be adopted into a forever home. Instead of idling in a shelter cage, they lounge in the comfortable apartment of Karen Stevens, 51, a publicist who’s fostered 40 dogs over the past six years. Foster pet parents like Stevens work with rescue groups or shelters to provide temporary homes for dogs until they’re ready for adoption. Some homeless animals are placed in foster care because a shelter is too crowded, or because they’re too young, or they need medical attention, socialization or basic behavioral training. Some animals need temporary placement because of a family emergency or military deployment.Many of them have one thing in common, Stevens says. “These animals will love you unconditionally,” she says. “They’ve been abused, they’ve been in the most horrific situations, and if you give them just a cup of kindness, you have a friend for life.” About 3.3 million dogs end up in U.S. shelters each year and 670,000 of them will be euthanized, according to Alyssa Fleck, spokeswoman for the American Society for the Prevention...
5 REASONS I’D LIKE TO BE MY DOG FOR A DAY

5 REASONS I’D LIKE TO BE MY DOG FOR A DAY

by Vet Street Amy Sinatra Ayres If only we could all sleep like Grizzly, a 14-year-old chocolate Lab. As I’m packing the kids’ lunches, trying to meet a deadline and squeezing in a trip to the gym, my dog is cozy in his bed, snoozing away, without a care in the world. If you’re a dog owner, I bet you’ve had the same thought cross your mind: How great would it be to be him? Here’s why I’ve often wished I could be my 14-year-old chocolate Labrador Retriever for a day. 1. All the sleep. As the owner of a senior dog, this is the most obvious to me. Grizzly’s day consists of the following: waking up, eating, then sleeping by my feet before my morning deadline. Looking for food from my daughters when they get up. Sleeping. Looking for scraps at lunch. Sleeping. Watching for possible food as dinner is made. A nap before bedtime. If I could get as much sleep as he gets for just one day, I think I would be set for the week. I’m jealous when I see how comfortable he looks in his many beds (or in my spot on my own bed), while his little feet race through his dreams. RELATED: SCHOOL-DAZE–TEACHER-CAUGHT-NAPPING–WHILE-STUDENTS-BRAWL 2. No work to do. While I watch him sleep, I’m usually working, and it’s hard not to feel a bit of envy. I mean, I love my job, but he has no deadlines, no sources who aren’t returning his calls, no challenge to come up with new ideas. No dishes, laundry or vacuuming. He basically has nothing he has to do, just things he wants to do. (Like, as you may guess...
Men can boost their attractiveness by owning this type of pet

Men can boost their attractiveness by owning this type of pet

By Diana Falzone Fox News Do you ever feel like Cupid has put you in the doghouse when it comes to finding love? Well, adopting a furry companion may help improve your fate. But not just any pet will do, a new survey suggests. THIS TYPE OF CHEATING IS ON THE RISE — HOW TO SPOT THE SIGNS Petsies, a company that makes stuffed animals, surveyed 1,000 men and women on how attracted they were to the opposite sex when possessing differently sized cats and dogs. Researchers showed study participants 12 pictures of the same people. Half of the group saw the person with a pet, while the other half saw him or her without a pet. Researchers used two pictures for each type of pet, and they were classified as “cat, kitten, puppies, small-sized dogs, medium-sized dogs and large-sized dogs.” Why cat owners may be unlucky in love In the study, women rated men toting puppies as almost 24 percent sexier, 14 percent more trustworthy and 13 percent more attractive than the same man not carrying a canine. Meanwhile, dogs that weren’t too big or too small gave women the biggest sexiness boost, as men rated them about 7 percent sexier and more attractive than if they weren’t carrying a canine at all. But in terms of trustworthiness, small dogs gave women the biggest advantage — men rated them nearly 9 percent more so than women without a dog.8 SIGNS YOU MIGHT BE DATING A NARCISSIST Owning a kitten or cat, on the other hand, didn’t do women in the survey any favors. Women with kittens were perceived as...