One of History’s greatest Crossover Fights Set for August 26th

One of History’s greatest Crossover Fights Set for August 26th

LAS VEGAS, NV After all of the speculation, questions, and doubts, the Connor McGregor vs. Floyd “Money” Mayweather fight is officially set. The UFC champion and the undefeated boxing champion are set to fight on August 26th. The desire to see this fight has been highly anticipated all year. Someone even created a Punch-Out style animation to mockingly simulate the fight. McGregor has been trying to lure someone into the ring. He’s talked smack about Brock Lesnar, pro wrestling, every fighter he’s ever fought, Mayweather, and even Jesus. This arrogant, O’Doul’s pint-sized leprechaun said that he could beat Jesus in the octagon. Does McGregor really think he stands a prayer against the one who knocked down an entire Roman army by merely uttering the words “I am he?” Yeah, good luck with that. But in God’s mercy, He lovingly sent the boxer who loves to hug and do prom slow dances in the middle of the ring, in His stead. Related: nhl-offseason-mayhem Which leads us to the question: who will prevail, the Irish river dancing fool or the slow prom dancing fool? Related: kaepernick-compares-cops-to-fugitive-slave-patrols McGregor’s last UFC fight was his victory against Eddie Alvarez, for the lightweight title, via TKO. This fight was historic because McGregor went up a weight class to gain this title. However, another equally historic fight was his KO victory against Jose Aldo for the featherweight title because Aldo went undefeated since 2006 and has had the WEC/UFC belt since 2009. Mcgregor has only suffered three losses in his career. So as arrogant as he has been, he’s been able to back up the smack...
Venus Williams ousted in fourth round at French Open

Venus Williams ousted in fourth round at French Open

Sandra Harwitt, Special for USA TODAY Sports PARIS — Venus Williams departed the French Open with a loss to Timea Bacsinszky of Switzerland for the second consecutive year. The 10th-seeded Williams, the last American remaining in the men’s or women’s singles draw, was upset by the 30th-seeded Bacsinszky 5-7, 6-2, 6-1 in a 2-hour, 12-minute fourth-round outing on Sunday. Last year, Bacsinszky turned back Williams in the same round in straight sets. The 36-year-old Williams rebounded from a 1-5 deficit in the first set, but then ran out of energy to fight back Bacsinszky in the final two sets. MORE TENNIS: Defending champion Garbine Muguruza upset at French Open This was a record-setting 20th time that Williams was playing at the French Open. She reached the final here once, in 2002, when she fell to sister, Serena, in the championship match. Williams’ departure means that the women’s draw has no former Grand Slam champions remaining. The last four Grand Slam champions —Svetlana Kuznetsova, Garbine Muguruza, Samantha Stosur and Williams — all lost...
Indy 500 outrage: Sports reporter out of a job after controversial tweet

Indy 500 outrage: Sports reporter out of a job after controversial tweet

By FOX 59 Indianapolis May 28, 2017: Takuma Sato, center, of Japan, celebrates after winning the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis.  (AP)   A longtime sportswriter no longer works at the Denver Post after being criticized about a controversial tweet about the winner of Sunday’s Indianapolis 500. “Nothing specifically personal, but I am very uncomfortable with a Japanese driver winning the Indianapolis 500 during Memorial Day weekend,” tweeted Terry Frei after Takuma Sato became the first Japanese driver to win the prestigious race. So @TFrei deleted this tweet. But I look forward to his future racing coverage pic.twitter.com/ZSjtBszTHs — Alan Cavanna (@CopaCavanna) May 28, 2017 Frei later took the tweet down and apologized, but not before a screenshot was taken and spread across the internet. I apologize. — Terry Frei (@TFrei) May 29, 2017 The newspaper tweeted its own apology Sunday. “The Denver post apologizes for a tweet sent by one of our reporters, Terry Frei, that does not reflect the standards and values of our organization,” read the statement. “We are treating this as a personnel issue and have no further comment at this time.” On Monday morning, the Post said Frei no longer works for the newspaper. It’s unclear if he was fired or resigned. “We apologize for the disrespectful and unacceptable tweet that was sent by one of our reporters. Terry Frei is no longer an employee of The Denver Post. It’s our policy not to comment further on personnel issues.” said publisher Mac Tully and editor Lee Ann Colacioppo in a statement on the Post’s website. “The tweet doesn’t represent what we believe nor...
Crash in Indianapolis 500 rips rear of Scott Dixon’s car off

Crash in Indianapolis 500 rips rear of Scott Dixon’s car off

by Fox News By Samuel Reiman The car driven by Scott Dixon, of New Zealand, goes over the top of Jay Howard, of England, in the first turn during the running of the Indianapolis 500 auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Sunday, May 28, 2017, in Indianapolis. (  (AP Photo/Marty Seppala) The rear end of Scott Dixon’s car ripped off in a crash with Jay Howard just over 50 laps into Sunday’s 200-lap Indianapolis 500. After being passed on the inside by Ryan Hunter-Reay, Howard hit the outside wall in Turn 1 then slid down the track into Scott Dixon.  REPLAY: @scottdixon9 checked, cleared, and released after this turn 1 incident during the #Indy500 at @IMS. #INDYCAR pic.twitter.com/gaD950M27F — IndyCar Series (@IndyCar) May 28, 2017 Dixon’s Chip Ganassi Racing Honda went airborne, flying over the top of Helio Castroneves before landing on the inside SAFER barrier, ripping the rear end of his machine off. Fortunately, both drivers were able to walk away. The red flag was flown due to a hole made in the infield safety fencing from the crash. A photographer in the infield narrowly avoided the wreck and was taken to the infield medical center for further observation. REPLAY: @scottdixon9 incident in turn 1 at @IMS #Indy500 #INDYCAR pic.twitter.com/JaK8lfx4nt — IndyCar Series (@IndyCar) May 28, 2017 Scott Dixon and Jay Howard have both been checked, cleared and released from the infield care center. The red flag period lasted for 19 minutes before the cars got back rolling again....
Alexander Rossi ready to put a year of firsts behind him and try to win at Indy again

Alexander Rossi ready to put a year of firsts behind him and try to win at Indy again

TIM BALK The firsts didn’t end for Alexander Rossi on May 29, 2016, the day he pulled off a shocking victory at the Indianapolis 500 as a rookie in the IndyCar Series. The win on what Rossi then described as the “greatest day” of his life would instead mark the beginning of more firsts to come. Take this past Monday, for example. Rossi the racer met Rossi the dog, a puppy named after the reigning Indy 500 champion. “I’ve never had an animal named after me,” Rossi said. At least as far as he’s aware. Win the Indianapolis 500, apparently, and people start naming their animals after you. RACING Simon Pagenaud goes into IndyCar Grand Prix with justifiable confidence There have been other firsts too. Earlier this month, Rossi tossed the first pitch at a Cubs game, an opportunity that the racer admitted might not have had the same impact on him as it would on others. Rossi said he had never played baseball, or even attended a baseball game, before making his appearance at Wrigley Field. But with this year’s Indy 500 coming up Sunday, Rossi will put a year of firsts in the rearview mirror and attempt to defend his crown. The fact that Rossi, who achieved a personal goal of reaching Formula One before signing with Andretti Autosport for 2016, faces such an opportunity in just his second appearance at the race is certainly unusual. But Rossi’s approach to the race itself is also unusual. “I don’t think that I’ve had the Indianapolis 500 as like a childhood dream since I was four or five years...
Cloud Computing surges past Always Dreaming to win Preakness

Cloud Computing surges past Always Dreaming to win Preakness

Chris Korman , USA TODAY Sports  Always Dreaming had a chance for a Triple Crown bid at the Preakness Stakes but was thwarted by Cloud Computing, a horse that didn’t race at this year’s Kentucky Derby. USA TODAY Sports (Photo: Amber Searls-USA TODAY Sports) BALTIMORE — Seth Klarman grew up three blocks from Pimlico Race Course, going to the betting windows as a teenager to learn the game. The hedge-fund manager started buying horses 25 years ago, eventually leading him back to his old track — where not much about the building has changed — as co-owner of a fresh horse named Cloud Computing in the 142nd Preakness Stakes. This trip had a different ending. He walked the stairs to the track’s signature cupola before hoisting the Woodlawn Vase, his colt having bolted down the stretch to beat Classic Empire by a head in a photo finish of the second leg of the Triple Crown. Cloud Computing covered the 1 3/16 miles in 1 minute, 55.98 seconds, paying $28.80. He won at 13-1 odds and becomes just the third non-Kentucky Derby runner to win the Preakness since 2000. There will be no Triple Crown winner for the second year in a row. Derby winner and 5-4 favorite Always Dreaming charged out to an early lead and dueled with 3-1 second choice Classic Empire through the final turn. He abruptly slowed — finishing eighth — and Cloud Computing made his move down the stretch. “We were in the position we expected to be and I think the turnaround was a little too quick,” said Always Dreaming trainer Todd Pletcher. “He ran...